Could the Singulair or the Breathing Exercises Weaned Me Off From My Asthma?

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Hello. I am a new comer to this site and would like some information about something. I have been a victim of asthma all my life and it was only the previous year that I was put on Singulair by my doctor. This drug really created a wonderful change in my life. I got my asthma under check for the first time in my whole life span. I started going to my dance classes once more and began enjoying life once again. But this did not last very long. I developed arthritis in both my knees. I first thought it was a result of my going to my dance classes and it was something to be expected at my age. It was then I came to read an article about this and researched further into it. It was sent to me by a friend and so I decided to give it a try. I began doing the exercises in this article and find that I have no trouble breathing at all. I have weaned off Singulair completely due to my arthritis and do not even use the inhaler even occasionally. What my query is whether just one course of Singulair did the trick for me or whether it was the breathing exercises? I am not really bothered but I just would like to get my doubt cleared.  I do not want to reach a wrong conclusion and get my hopes up unnecessarily. I would like to know whether there is anyone else out there who has tried both these therapies and could clear my doubt for me.
asked Feb 7, 2011 by anonymous

1 Answer

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Singulair has been reported to be effective in asthma control. Breathing exercises have also been proven to keep asthma in check.  Your case has proven the efficacy of both approaches. What you are enjoying right now could be the effect of two consecutive approaches that are effective. Mild-to-moderate asthma can improve over time, and in some cases, adults can experience a period of remission. Improvements have been reported even in some severe cases depending on the timeliness and effectiveness of treatment. While there used to be only anecdotal evidence of breathing exercise efficacy, a 2008 study in Australia found that regular breathing exercise reduced the use of asthma prevention and relief medications by 50 and 86 percent, respectively. You may continue your breathing exercises if this has improved your quality of life as long as you are also prepared with a medication prescribed by your doctor in case of asthma attack.
answered Feb 9, 2011 by chmreyes Helpful Soul (81 points)

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